Autism in the Workplace

Autism in the Workplace

There’s a new frontier in diversity programs focused not on race or gender but on cognitive ability. An increasing number of companies are launching initiatives to find job candidates with autism. Unfortunately, People with disabilities are twice as likely to be unemployed as people without disabilities and in the case of neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as autism, the number may be far higher. Employers are now taking a second look at people with autism and seeing not deficits, but a pool of dormant talent.

Social difficulties are one of the hallmarks of autism, making it hard to make it through a traditional hiring process. Roughly 60% of people with autism have average or above average intelligence, yet 85% are unemployed. Employers are now trying to harness that talent by providing a more practical way of assessing a prospective employee’s skills rather than relying on a traditional job interview with requires social communication and eye contact.

Companies like Peak Peformance www.pptcenters.com train and help to place those with autism in the work force. They work in conjunction with employers to provide participants with the specific tools for success in the work force. Employers have also found that there is a lower turnover rate of employees in highly repetitive jobs when jobs are analyzed to properly place with individual talents.
People with autism bring unique strengths to the workforce. Supporting neurodiversity and hiring people with autism because of their differences and not in spite of them benefits both employer and employee.

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